Posts Tagged ‘healdsburg property management’


Monday, July 1st, 2013


Sonoma County is experiencing a series of 100+ degree days, expected to continue through the 4th. When the “Cool down” comes, it’s only supposed to drop to mid-nineties. We at Sonoma County Vacations would like to provide guests with a couple of items to help make their stays enjoyable.

1. If you have no pool at the home you’re renting, see about turning the hot tub down so you have a dipping pool of sorts;

2. Make sure to turn air conditioners off at night so they don’t freeze up (in which case you’ll have no air or you could break the system).

3. Most home air conditioners are not sized for industrial strength like hotels. When it’s this hot, they lose some functionality, and no matter how low you turn it, it’s not going to cool down. In fact, setting it below 75 could freeze it up. Be sure to give the A/C a break, especially between the hottest hours, 4-8 p.m., set it a little higher.

4. At night, after the sun goes down open all windows and doors which have a screen, and leave open until early morning, then shut everything, close drapes, blinds, etc to keep the house dark and cool.

How to use a vacation rental

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Many of the complaints and bad reviews we get are when we have to withhold a guest’s security deposit.  We HATE withholding money from others, and do NOT keep one dime to pad our own bank account.  It ALL goes to repairs or to the property owners to settle a neighbor’s complaint.

So I would like to write about the proper use of a vacation rental home.

1.  Pay attention to the contract you’ve signed.  Many homes do NOT include heating the pool in the price you’ve paid and you will need to pay extra.  If the pool is heated by propane, especially, it is expensive.  Our start up costs are $300 to bring to temperature and $100/day to keep at temperature, and that’s typically 83 degrees.

2.  Be sure to touch base with the owner or management company for questions ahead of time.  Many times your concerns or extra needs can be handled effortlessly if each party (guest and property owner/manager) has the time to respond.

3.  Get your contract signed and returned immediately, discuss any questions immediately, so you’re not waiting for key or gate codes as you’re trying to arrive.

4.  When you arrive, read the guest book which typically goes over how to operate anything tricky.  Walk around right away to make sure you understand where things are, then call right away if you don’t understand or see something you thought was there or should be provided.

5.  Don’t wait until evening to call for a repair or needed item unless it’s an emergency.  Vacation homes are not like hotels.  They do not have 24/7 staff available for repairs.

6.  When you vacate, follow the list of instructions.  Typically these include putting furniture back where you found it, especially outside, turn off, lock, secure windows and doors and air conditioning or heat.

7.  Vacate when you’ve agreed to vacate.  Housekeepers and inspectors may not be seen, but they’re often they’re waiting for you, and if there’s no agreed delay in check out, guests may be charged for the additional time they’ve used.

I hope this helps, and thanks for reading.


Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

In the spirit of Memorial Day and summer coming, today’s blog is a series of quick tips.
1. If traveling in a place where language is a barrier for you, snap or upload a photo of the place/places you want to go and keep in your cell phone.

2. Pack everything in your carry on in clear plastic bags. If you need to open your luggage everything can be seen easily.

3. Do you have a large family or group getting together? Consider renting a home instead of several hotel rooms.

4. Keep the mosquitoes away with: garlic, electric fans, lemon dish soap, and watering the lawn.

5. Items you can use to c lean the grill? Dryer sheets, Newspaper, Orange Peel, aluminum foil.

6. Uses for a golf tee: Makeshift cap for tube of lotion, toothpaste, etc., Corn on the cob holders, garden markers (next to bulbs, perennials), or party stake to keep balloons from floating away.

7.  Off the beaten path — drive from Alexander Valley, Healdsburg, through Pine flat and come out at Cloverdale.  The old town (nothing left) of Mercuryville is a nice view point, and the Russian River can be seen in its wild and beautiful run through canyons.  Gorgeous when the hills are still green.  Take a picnic, have plenty of gas.  When in Cloverdale, try Hamburger Ranch, , or Ruth McGowan’s Brew Pub.  Both are fun stops.



Monday, May 6th, 2013


An article in the Santa Rosa Press Democrat recently peaked my interest. It was titled “Is Yelp Really Just a Forum for Blowhards” and I must say, I’ve felt that way many, many times. Admittedly Yelp has been a thorn in my side, as they’ve allowed a former employee to rant about working here, and a post which simply said ‘they discriminate on young people’. These posts are not what Yelp is meant to do, which is help the consumer when considering their purchase. So, with that in mind, and a little taste of lemon puckering my lips at them, here is a summary of the article written by Sandy Banks, appearing in the Sunday, 4/28/2013 print.

It all started when Ms. Banks went into a restaurant, not checking on Yelp first, enjoyed her experience, then saw a sign in the window ‘Stop the Bully. Boycott Yelp’. She uses the site to get the low down on most everything she does, and later found the restaurant was rated a 3 of 5 stars and had 88 Yelp reviews. The restaurant suggested (and two lawsuits have suggested) that if they paid for Yelp ads, they’d be ranked higher, but instead the negative reviews were filtered to appear first.

The restaurant said their customers repeatedly submitted very good reviews that never show up on the web site. Yelp’s response to the restaurant “perhaps if you paid to do Yelp ads, we could help with this” and they couldn’t determine when asked, why the positive reviews weren’t showing up.

I agree. The same has happened here. We’ve had thousands of guests stay with us, most share a positive experience, and yet, the majority appear negative on Yelp. I gave up for a long time, assuming it was part of the new internet experience, where it gave a voice only to those that wanted to be seen, heard, and blast, not offering anything constructive.

I have a son that works here that has a traumatic brain injury. Now he is not necessarily the best in customer service, but he tries damn hard, and it’s part of his recovery to work. So push come to shove, who will I chose, even if my business suffers? Of course all the mothers out there know, it’s going to be my son.

But let me explain what happened with one review. A guest checked in early, miffed they couldn’t get into the home ahead of time. My son had his lunch on the desk, finishing up while leaving the door open (it was a Saturday and a very relaxed day with us) for potential customers.

Long story short, they gave us a bad review because he was eating his lunch, and delayed them getting in (even though they were early, mind you).

So that’s my bias, I admit, with Yelp. Too many people post to tear people down, rather than give constructive advise.

But on the other hand…????

Hot topics via PhoCusWright

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013


Travel and Social Media: changing minds

Social media isn’t moving the travel needle, at least not yet. True, every travel company needs a social media strategy. Facebook is focused on making the travel vertical big business. How?

Interaction/commentary that is public, Google +, maps, TripAdvisor, reviews, You Tube flash. Lots of content attracts the traveler, quick responses, but still, nothing like the phone call and one on one interaction.

Reflecting on living in Northern California Wine Country

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

I thought about writing yesterday, but in the wake of what happened in Boston, I decided that silence might be the best course of action. And as I reflect on it, I consider living in Sonoma County.

We are like a little country that could carve itself out of the state and sustain ourself. We have agriculture, cattle, fishing, job sustainability, mountains, lakes, parks, the ocean…we’re pretty damn lucky we can live here.

I know I’m fortunate to also work here and not have to commute to the Bay Area to earn a living, and to have raised my family here as well has been wonderful with the good schools available.

I’m taking a day to thank the people who have stayed with us, given us their business, and the long term relationship we’ve established with many property owners, tenants, and guests.

Many of you know our son suffered a traumatic brain injury about ten years ago, and working here has been challenging but so rewarding watching him grow and become an able minded adult, loving and appreciative of his life. We also thank our customers for their understanding with his challenges at times.

As we go about our day today, perhaps we can allow a gentleness to wash through us when our patience runs thin, and our anger begins to rise and remember we do have our lives, with all the challenges that come.

Maintenance at Vacation Rental Properties

Friday, April 12th, 2013

It occurs to us that guests may have no clue as to the preparation of a vacation home. Why isn’t something working when the company has supposedly checked the home prior to your stay? How come a light bulb is out where I need it most, or a faucet leaks, or cobwebs are in the corner?

Sonoma County Vacations/Healdsburg Property Management has one of the company’s owners personally inspect and prepare the property. He trouble shoots items such as smoke alarm batteries chirping, light bulbs that are out, overnight cobwebs (yes, they come up overnight due to the agriculture) and hot tub problems.

Even so, a house is just that, and systems fail and break and go out.

No company or property owner would ever want a guest to be without, or be unhappy, but these things happen. Is it fun to be set on having a hot tub and it breaks down? No, of course not. Some companies have written in their procedures and contracts that no discounts are given for systems that have failed. This is typical along the coast or at rural properties.

To get maintenance personnel out the same day, get parts, etc., sometimes isn’t achievable. Every owner or company does whatever they can and whatever is in their power, but for example, when we walk out the door after inspecting, a smoke alarm battery can fail. A dishwasher may start to leak. A bird may have made a nest in the chimney and because we do not make fires, leaving them to burn unattended in a fireplace, we won’t know about it.

Bottom line — we want our guests to be happy. Is it 100% achievable? No, but we keep trying, as I believe all companies and property owners do.

Scenic Drive Cloverdale, CA – Mendocino, CA

Sunday, May 2nd, 2010

This last week I took a scenic drive with my family to the Mendocino Coast from northern Sonoma County, Healdsburg/Cloverdale via Hwy 128.  I always forget how beautiful this drive is through Anderson Valley and the Redwoods and it only takes 1.5 hours to get to Mendocino, however it’s a beautiful day of relaxation and liesure if you treat it gently.

Begin at the Hamburger Ranch and Pasta Farm restaurant, where you can have breakfast to begin your day or a great bbq dinner on their patio to end your day.  It’s a reasonably priced, great place that’s been in business a long time, serving both locals and visitors alike.

Here you begin Hwy 128 East, heading to Yorkville Highlands.  This is a beautiful winding road, dotted with multiple wineries, gorgeous redwoods, apple orchards, vineyards, 2 state parks, a river and…you get it — a variety of settings and attractions.

Yorkville and Yorkville highlands are the first ‘civilization’ that you come to from leaving Cloverdale.  Yorkville consists of a store/deli and several wineries including Maple Creek, and Yorkville Cellars.  The store seems to be closed sometimes more than it’s open, but we’ve found that ‘regular’ hours are 9-3, M-F and longer on weekends.  Standard sandwiches and drinks can be purchased for a great picnic in upcoming Hendy Woods.  Each of these locations is attractive and offers tastings, things to do and can give you a great history of the area:

Events in this area include 2010 Yorkville Highlands Festival on August 14, 2010, Mendocino Music Festival, Yorkville Highlands Wine Festival, Grape Stomp and BBQ on August 29th and the Mendocino County Fair in Booneville in September.

Now you’re moving on to Bonneville, which is a hub of Mendocino County and home to the fair in September.  There is a hotel, several restaurants, market and some great wineries.  My recommendation is the pinot noir,  which this area is known for, however I also love the Guwertzemeiner.   Staying as inexpensive as possible until we reach Mendocino, we like to stop at the Redwood Drive In, good for burgers and tacos, or get a sandwich at the market or deli.

Farmers Market on Saturdays

Located in the parking lot of the Boonville Hotel, in downtown Boonville, this is a good place to buy fresh fruit, vegetables, bread, plants and flowers. The market is open on Saturdays from 9:00 till noon, first part of May till the end of October.

The apple orchards and vineyards begin in ernest once you leave Booneville.  Wineries that I think have beautiful settings in addition to great wine are:

5601 Hwy 128, Philo
707 895-3686

5501 Hwy 128, Philo
707 895-2002

4400 Hwy 128, Philo
707 895-3216

Next is Philo.  A small town in and of itself, historically created for the beautiful redwood lumber in surrounding areas that was available.  Now it is an artsy town with a gallery or two, store, restaurant and wineries.

A great stop north of Philo is the Gowan Oak Tree Fruit stand.

Gowan’s Oak Tree
Philo, Ca
707 895-3353

This roadside garden and orchard is located 2.5 miles north of Philo on Highway 128. Open every day June-March 8 am – 6 pm, December-March 8:30 am – 5:30 pm. The Gowan’s and their ancesters, the Studebaker’s have been growing at this site for 120 years.  Jim and Jo Gowan (pictured above) are now in their mid seventies but you can still see them working at the stand. With the help of their children and grandchildren they farm 250 acres of apples and peaches plus a 25 acre vegetable garden. Here is a list of some of the fresh fruits and vegetables you will see at Gowan’s:

Fruits. Apples sixty varieties, Pears eight varieties, Peaches thirty eight varieties, apricots, berries, cherries, prunes, persimmons and plums.

Vegetables. Peas two kinds, Summer Squash six kinds, Tomatoes fourteen kinds, Cucumbers three kinds, Beans six kinds, Pototoes four kinds, Cabbage, Corn eight kinds, Peppers eight kinds, Eggplant, Winter Squash fifteen kinds, Pumpkins eight kinds.

Other items are: Indian corn, Ornamental Gourds, Strawberry Popcorn, Walnuts.

This is a year-round business but of course not all varieties are available at the same time however, fresh and frozen apple cider, fruit popsicles and dried fruit are available all year.

Now the great redwood trees begin.  There are several good camping spots if that’s your thing.  I love Paul Dimmick Campground for its swimming in the Navarro River, and beautiful campsites in the redwoods.  There’s nothing like the smell of a redwood forest for my money.  Also, beautiful though, especially to walk in, is Hendy Woods.  Nice summer camping, lots of area for kids to bike, hike and swim. This campground is about 1 hour from the coast. When the coast is fogged in lots of abalone divers camp here and commute to the coast. A nice campground in the summer heat because of the redwood canopy. Winter camping is very damp but tranquil and picturesque. The park gets 40 to 100 inches of precipitation per year creating a moist and lush environment. The Navarro River can rise dramatically to the edge of the park. Temps are mostly in the 40s to 50s. Lots of mushrooms and wildflowers.

Paul Dimmick — Located in the Navarro River Redwoods State Park at the 8 mile marker on Highway 128.
The camp has 27 sites in tall redwood trees, not much sun, but cool in the hot summer. The Navarro river is only a few feet away from all sites.
There is catch and release, in the Navarro river, with barbless hooks, during some water levels.
There is no wood gathering and no extra fee for dogs but they must be kept on a leash.
Pickup campers are OK but larger RVs will not make the turns and the parking areas are small. Take it from one who has tried, don’t take a trailer in there unless you are an expert backer and don’t mind getting a few dings in it.
There is some posion oak around so pay attention.
The flush toilets are closed during the winter but there are pit toilets all year.
Campsites are $10 in summer and $5 in winter. This includes two motor vehicles. $5 for additional motor vehicle. There is no day use fee.
This camp sometimes floods big time in wet winters. In fact it is sometimes 10 feet under water. If you plan on camping here during rainy weather keep a ear on the radio and be prepared to move. There are no picnic tables, running water and flush toilets during winter months.

Senior discount is $2 except for hike and bike sites

Next town is Navarro.  Just out of Philo you can see the Navarro River begin.  This river is beautiful!  Refreshing in summer (if you can find it — local secret — there is a great swimming hole off 128 with sandy beach.  The blue water, sand and redwood trees are striking against one another!!), good for fishing, or just sunning on the banks.  The town of Navarro has a store.  Big stands of redwoods continue until just before you reach the  coast and you can see where the big Navarro river exits to the ocean here.

Now you junction Hwy 1 where you can head south and visit Elk, Manchester, Irish Beach and Point Arena, or continue north to Albion, Little River, Mendocino and Fort Bragg.


*8 – 14th annual Boonville Beer Festival sponsored by the Anderson Valley Brewery. 53 or more micro brewies pour beer from 1 to 5 pm at the Mendocino County Fairgrounds in Boonville. Tickets are $40 in advance, $50 at the gate and $5 for non-drinker. RV and tent camping is available at the fairgrounds, $12 for tents and or $30 for RV’s. For more information click the link or call 707 895-2337.

Anderson Valley Garden VIP tour with Extra Special Bonus Garden and wine reception. 12 pm – 6 pm. See entry below for details on the tour.

No one knows if they are doing it this year! Anderson Valley Garden Tour 10 am – 5 pm. Public tour of 5 gardens, some never before open to the public, located along the 128 corridor between Yorkville Highlands and Philo. The gardens are between 1 and 5 acres in size. They display water features, xeriscape planting, a living roof, a tree house for adults, a Laburnum Walk, a lavender field, vegetable gardens and small orchards including one featuring multi-grafted fruit trees with local heritage varieties, a large rose garden, and several with spectacular vistas. All tickets must be purchase prior to the event. Tickets may be purchased through the Botanical Gardens’ web site or in the Botanical Garden’s store located 18220 North Highway 1, Fort Bragg, CA 95437. Tickets will go on sale the beginning of April. The tour is limited to the first 400 guests. The event has been held since 2004 and always sells out. Saturday Tour: $45 per person or 2 for $80. Friday VIP tickets $125 per person. Box lunches at $15 per person are optional and paid for when purchasing tickets. Lunch ticket holders are invited to eat and visit the garden and vineyard at Goldeneye Winery near Philo. Contact person is Ry Southard 707 964-5352 ext 11

*15-17 – 13th Annual Pinot Noir Festival sponsored by Anderson Valley Winegrowers. More than 40 wineries will pour Pinot at the Boonville Fairgrounds. Local wineries will have open houses for special tastings, seminars, food pairings. Tickets are limited and sells out each year.

*16 – Pinot Party and tasting at Brutocao Cellars, 7000 Highway 128 in Philo. Free pinot testing from the barrel, music, munches and elbow rubbing. 11-4

*23 – Philo Yacht Club Regatta under the bridge on Philo Greenwood Road just off high 128. Build or buy your boat and bring it to the river at high noon. Trophies for best and fastest boats. Bring your lunch and drinks and hang out and watch the boats float or sink. It’s free and fun.

*29 through 31 – The Anderson Valley Artists’ Guild is having it’s 8th annual Artist’s Open Studio Tour all week-end. Visit the studios and workshops of 20 local artist including painters, sculptures, jewelers, funiture makers, glass blowers, letterpress printers, ceramics, photographers, etc. The tour is 3 days 11-5. Studios will be highlighted by signboards on Highway 128 as well as waving yellow banners at each studio entrance. Brochures with maps to the studios will be available at All That Good Stuff in Boonville next to the ice cream store. And of course it’s free. For further information call 707 895-2717.

Memorial Day Flea Market. This is a fund raiser for the Senior Center. In the parking lot in front of the Senior Center.

*30 – Lions Club tri-tip BBQ dinner at the Boonville Fairgrounds. 4-7:30 benefits Anderson Valley Elder Home.

*28-29 – The Anderson Valley Theater Guild’s presents the comedy “Dearly Departed” at the Grange on Highway 128, half way between Boonville and Philo. Tickets are $10 in advance. Tickets at All that good stuff in Boonville and Lemon’s Market in Philo. Tickets at the door $12 and $10 for seniors and students. The play starts at 7 pm both Friday and Saturday nights. For further information call the director Rod Basehore,  707 895-3191. (See June 4-5 for different play dates)


*4-5 – The Anderson Valley Theater Guild’s presents the comedy “Dearly Departed ” at the Grange on Highway 128, half way between Boonville and Philo. Tickets are $10 in advance. Tickets at All that good stuff in Boonville and Lemon’s Market in Philo. Tickets at the door $12 and $10 for seniors and students. The play starts at 7 pm both Friday and Saturday nights. For further information call the director Rod Basehore,  707 895-3191. (See May 28-29 for different play dates)

Farmers Market at the Boonville Hotel 9:45 til Noon every Saturday.

*18-19-20 – Sierra Nevada World Music Festival. A 3 Day Music and Camping Festival Featuring the Best in Reggae and World Music. Mendocino County Fairgrounds in downtown Boonville. Three days of world music. Camping.


Farmers Market at the Boonville Hotel 9:45 til Noon every Saturday.

*4 – Fourth of July Celebration at the Boonville Fairgrounds sponsored by the AV Education Foundation. Kids costume parade, music, food, drink, chili cook-off, huckleberry pie, and clowns.

Woolgrower’s BBQ and Sheep Dog Trails at the fairgrounds in Boonville. BBQ and live music at the Navarro Store located on the Navarro curve west of Philo. The Subdudes, a 5 piece New Orleans light rock and blue grass band will play starting at 5pm. There is a rib, steak, chicken BBQ that starts eariler. For more information call Dave at 707 895-9445

*31 – Winetasting Championships at the Greenwood Ridge Winery in Philo. Wine tasting contest for beginners and professionals. Also chocolate and cheese tasting and munches. Information call 707 895-2002


Farmers Market at the Boonville Hotel 9:45 til Noon every Saturday.

*14 – Boonville Airport fly-in. Mostly old planes. Small and friendly.

Lyons Club BBQ. Tri-tip and silent auction. 4:40-7:30 at the fairgrounds in downtown Boonville. $15/person benifits the Anderson Valley Ambulance.

*29 – Yorkville Highlands Wine Festival – 2 pm-7 pm. Meyer Family Cellars, Highway 128 @ mile marker 34.2 just west of Yorkville. Wine tasting of local wines, boar burgers & lamb BBQ, games, live music, silent auction, grape stomp. Tickets $40 ($50 at the gate). 707-894-9177. Proceeds benefit the Yorkville Fire Station & the Non-profit Yorkville Highlands Growers & Vintners Association.


Labor Day Week-End Flea Market. This is a fund raiser for the Senior Center. Located in the parking lot in front of the Senior Center.

Farmers Market at the Boonville Hotel 9:45 till Noon every Saturday

*6 – Yorkville Ice Cream Social at the Yorkville fire station. 11-4. Ice cream floats, burgers, dogs, cake walk, rummage sale, raffles, BBQed oysters, fun and games. Benefits Yorkville Fire Station and community efforts.

*17-18-19 – Mendocino County Fair, Apple Show, Rodeo, Sheep Dog Trails, Classic Car Show, Carnival, and so on, at the fairgrounds in Boonville. Fri & Sat 8-midnight, Sun 9-midnight.

California Wool and Fiber Festial. Follow the thread from the animal to the fabric. This festival is part of the Mendocino County Fair listed above.

If you’re starting in Sonoma County Wine Country, Healdsburg Property Management/Sonoma County Vacations has several vacation rental homes that begin in Cloverdale, where you can jump off and explore the Anderson Valley.  You can find them on our web site at, click on Vacation Rentals, All Accommodations, or use the search feature on the home page.  The names are Starling’s Rest, Beaux Reves, Jimtown House, Geyerville Vineyard Lake House, and Walden Cottage.  Each of these homes are priced differently and range from budget to moderate, and accommodate from 4-8 guests.

I hope you enjoy this drive as much as I do.  It immediately begins to help with my stress, and the smells and sounds in the redwood forest just can’t be replicated.  For an interesting and very thorough site on Anderson Valley, please see:  — the developer of this site has done an outstanding job.

If you go through to Mendocino, don’t miss the jam and mustard shop all the way at the end of Main Street, eat lunch at the Mendocino Hotel — great and Zagat rated, have coffee and cookies at the bakery (I think on Albion Street), and don’t miss walking or viewing the Mendocino Headlands at the end of Heeser Drive.  Caves, rock formations, and gorgeous colors of the water and waves can keep you occupied forever!  My husband dove here (it needs to be a calm day!) and the water drops to 100 feet offering beautiful walls and pinnacles full of scallops.  I fished here and didn’t caught a capazoni, great eating.  A little north is McKericher State Park, and right now the seals are thick in the cove at the end of the boardwalk and are fun to watch.

Rental Scams

Saturday, April 24th, 2010

The latest scam on Craig’s List and other free listing sites involves trying to get an unwary propect’s identification. A reputable property management company or property owner will never or should never ask for the application before you’ve seen the property and will never be in Africa or the UK trying to do it online.  Never send money, never fill out their application.  Here is one that just hit today — looks like it could be legit, right?  Has my supposed e mail in it, but it’s not me.  It’s a bogus.  Has an application, but it’s not ours.

Beware of the free listing sites for this kind of stuff — Craig’s List, Oodle, Kijiji, hot pads, and many many more.  Do your homework and don’t be caught.  We report these things to the various listing sites and the FBI, however they are overloaded and flooded.  The FBI says it’s the number one problem occupying their time, so it’s up to us to be deligent.

From: Pamela Taeuffer []
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2010 6:52 AM
To: James Bateman
Subject: Re: $800 / 2br – 2 Bedroom Home in Healdsburg!!! (Healdsburg, CA)

Hello Dear,

Thanks for the email. I and my husband own the house and also want you to know that it was due to my transfer to ( West Africa , Nigeria ) that makes us to leave the house and also want to give it out for rent and looking for a responsible person and God
fearing person who can take very good care of the house in my absence.we are not
after the money for the rent but want it to be clean all the time and the person
that will rent it to take it as if it were its own.
So for now, I am  here in West Africa and will be staying here for the next 3
years in our new house and also with the keys of the house for rent, we try to
look for an agent that we can give this documents and the keys before we left
but could not find, and we as well  do not want our house to be used any how in
our absence that is why we took it along with us.
We came over to Africa for a missionary work, so i hope you will promise us
that you will  take very good care of the house. So get back to me if you know
you could take care of our house or perhaps experience you have in renting home.
Hope you are okay with the price of $800 per month and  the security Deposit
is $600.You are advised to go and view the property exterior before getting back to me with the rental application.

My Husband Contact Number:  0112348122598647 or +2348122598647

Bedrooms:2     Monthly Rent:$800
Address:14635 Kinley Drive, Healdsburg, CA 95448
Bathrooms:1        Deposit:$600

Air Conditioner Dishwasher Walk-in Closet     Disposal
Microwave    Views    Playground  washer/dryer    Public Trans.

Pets,Dogs, Cats, Other Pets ok..

Rental Application

Applicant Information

Date of birth: Cell: Phone:
Current address:
City: State: ZIP Code:
Own( )     Rent (* ) Monthly payment or rent: How long?
Previous address:
City: State: ZIP Code:
Owned*  Rented (Please circle) Monthly payment or rent: How long?

Employment Information

Current employer:
Employer address: When did you intend to move in?
Phone: E-mail: Fax:
City: State: ZIP Code:
Position: Hourly  Salary   (Please circle) Annual income:

Emergency Contact

Name of a person not residing with you:
City: State: ZIP Code: Phone:
Relationship: friend

Co-applicant Information, if Married

Date of birth: Cell: Phone:
Current address:
City: State: ZIP Code:
Own      Rent*  (Please circle) Monthly payment or rent: How long?
Previous address:
City: State: ZIP Code:
Owned*  Rented    (Please circle) Monthly payment or rent: How long?

Co-applicant Employment Information

Current employer:
Employer address: How long?
Phone: E-mail: Fax:
City: State: ZIP Code:
Position: Hourly      Salary     (Please Circle) Annual income :


Name: Address: Phone:
I authorize the verification of the information provided on this form as to my credit and employment. I have received a copy of this application.

Signature of applicant:


Signature of co-applicant:


Healdsburg Jazz Festival June 04-13

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010

The 12th annual Healdsburg Jazz Festival is just two months away! Don’t miss it this year, it’s a musical experience you won’t regret. And tickets are now available for all shows!

Here is the schedule of perfomances!

Monday, April 5
Randy Vincent and Chris Amberger
guitar and acoustic bass

Tuesday, April 6
Dick Conte and Steve Webber
piano and acoustic bass

Friday, April 9
Bennett Roth-Newell and John Norris
Piano and Acoustic Bass

Saturday, April 10
Lee Charlton Trio
with Tony D’Anna and Rob Wright
Piano, Acoustic Bass and Drums

Monday, April 12
David Howard and Stephanie Ozer
guitar and piano

Tuesday, April 13
Miles Wick and Michael Coleman
piano and bass

Friday, April 16
Stephanie Ozer and Chuck Metcalf Duo
Piano and Acoustic Bass

Saturday, April 17
Chuck Metcalf Trio
with David Udolf and Chuck McPherson
Piano, Acoustic Bass and Drums

Monday, April 19
Greg Hester and Jim Passarell
piano and acoustic bass

Tuesday, April 20
Christian Foley-Beining and Tom Shader
guitar and acoustic bass

Friday, April 23
Susan Sutton and Bill Fouty Duo
Piano and Acoustic Bass

Saturday, April 24
Chris Amberger Trio
with Grant Levin and Chuck McPherson
Piano, Acoustic Bass and Drums

Monday, April 26
Ricardo Peixoto and Carlos Oliviera
guitar duo

Tuesday, April 27
John Youngblood and Gus Garelick
guitar and violin

Friday, April 30
Ken Cook and Cliff Hugo Duo
Piano and Acoustic Bass

Have fun and see you at one of the performances!